10 Student Sexual Assault Prevention Activists to Know!: #6 Lena Sclove, Brown University

10 Student Sexual Assault Prevention Activists to Know!

Throughout the course of the last year, we at SAFER have proudly watched numerous student sexual assault prevention activists speak out against the prevalence of sexual assault on their campuses and call for changes to college and universities policies regarding sexual violence.

In honor of Sexual Assault ACTIVISM Month, SAFER will highlight 10 student sexual assault prevention activists around the nation who are creating change on their campus!

#6 Lena Sclove, Brown University

In November 2013, Lena Sclove, an undergraduate student at Brown University, received word that her assailant, who had been found guilty of multiple counts of sexual assault against Sclove by the university’s Student Conduct Board, would not face expulsion, but rather be suspended for only one year (despite the Board’s recommendation that the assailant receive at minimum a two-year suspension). Sclove attempted to appeal the decision, but her appeal request was rejected. On April 22, Sclove, along with over 80 students and faculty members, gathered to protest the the University’s decision to permit her assailant to return to campus in the Fall of 2014. Sclove will continue to fight the University’s decision and needs our continued support in doing so.

SAFER provides student activists with a variety of resources, including the Activist Resource Center, which is our online library of sexual assault-related information and resources; on-campus Teach-Ins for student activists, which are led by skilled facilitators and equip students with the skills and information needed to bring about policy reforms and change; and, our Activist Mentoring Program (AMP!), which is our free mentoring service that provides students with continued support after they have completed an on-campus Teach-In.

 

    10 Student Sexual Assault Prevention Activists to Know!: #5 Founders of Silence is Violence, Wesleyan University

    10 Student Sexual Assault Prevention Activists to Know!

    Throughout the course of the last year, we at SAFER have proudly watched numerous student sexual assault prevention activists speak out against the prevalence of sexual assault on their campuses and call for changes to college and universities policies regarding sexual violence.

    In honor of Sexual Assault ACTIVISM Month, SAFER will highlight 10 student sexual assault prevention activists around the nation who are creating change on their campus!

    From the Silence is Violence Website

    Founders of Silence is Violence, Wesleyan University

    Four undergraduate students, Mari Jarris ’14, Chloe Murtagh ’15, John Nelson ’16, and Lynn Ma ’16, at Wesleyan University, Connecticut, launched the website Silence is Violence to feature testimonials of survivors of sexual assault and student-submitted quotes of overheard conversations on campus that they found triggering or offensive. While the quotes are definitely triggering, they highlight the insensitivity often shown towards sexual assault survivors and the aggressive language by assailants.

    SAFER provides student activists with a variety of resources, including the Activist Resource Center, which is our online library of sexual assault-related information and resources; on-campus Teach-Ins for student activists, which are led by skilled facilitators and equip students with the skills and information needed to bring about policy reforms and change; and, our Activist Mentoring Program (AMP!), which is our free mentoring service that provides students with continued support after they have completed an on-campus Teach-In.

      10 Student Sexual Assault Prevention Activists to Know!: #4 Members of “No Red Tape”, Columbia University

      10 Student Sexual Assault Prevention Activists to Know!

      Throughout the course of the last year, we at SAFER have proudly watched numerous student sexual assault prevention activists speak out against the prevalence of sexual assault on their campuses and call for changes to college and universities policies regarding sexual violence.

      In honor of Sexual Assault ACTIVISM Month, SAFER will highlight 10 student sexual assault prevention activists around the nation who are creating change on their campus!

      #4: Members of “No Red Tape“, Columbia University

      SAFER was founded in New York City at Columbia University in 2000 and, despite a legacy of student sexual assault prevention activism, the institution is again facing allegations that administrators have mistreated survivors, failed to adequately record the allegations of survivors, and protected known repeat-rapists. On admitted students day in April 2014, members of No Red Tape handed out copies of a letter to prospective freshman on the epidemic of college sexual assault and the need for reform at Columbia. The students were quickly removed from the admitted students event and not permitted to return.

      SAFER provides student activists with a variety of resources, including the Activist Resource Center, which is our online library of sexual assault-related information and resources; on-campus Teach-Ins for student activists, which are led by skilled facilitators and equip students with the skills and information needed to bring about policy reforms and change; and, our Activist Mentoring Program (AMP!), which is our free mentoring service that provides students with continued support after they have completed an on-campus Teach-In.

        10 Student Sexual Assault Activists to Know!: #3: Kate Sim, Harvard University

        10 Student Sexual Assault Activists to Know!

        Throughout the course of the last year, we at SAFER have proudly watched numerous student sexual assault prevention activists speak out against the prevalence of sexual assault on their campuses and call for changes to college and universities policies regarding sexual violence.

        In honor of Sexual Assault ACTIVISM Month, SAFER will highlight 10 student sexual assault prevention activists around the nation who are creating change on their campus!

        # 3 Kate Sim, Harvard University

        Left: Kate Sim ’14

        Kate Sim is a student at Harvard University and founder of Our Harvard Can Do Better, which is a student activist organization working on the college, university and national level to advocate for survivor-centric, intersectionally inclusive reform of sexual violence policies. Sim, along with her fellow Harvard Activists, filed a Title IX complaint against Harvard after members of the faculty mistreated survivors and after activists discovered that the University’s current sexual assault policy is over twenty years old. In addition to her work with Our Harvard, Sims is active with Know Your IX.

        SAFER provides student activists with a variety of resources, including the Activist Resource Center, which is our online library of sexual assault-related information and resources; on-campus Teach-Ins for student activists, which are led by skilled facilitators and equip students with the skills and information needed to bring about policy reforms and change; and, our Activist Mentoring Program (AMP!), which is our free mentoring service that provides students with continued support after they have completed an on-campus Teach-In.

          10 Student Sexual Assault Activists to Know!: #2 Members of Brandeis Students Against Sexual Violence, Brandeis University

          10 Student Sexual Assault Activists to Know!

          Throughout the course of the last year, we at SAFER have proudly watched numerous student sexual assault prevention activists speak out against the prevalence of sexual assault on their campuses and call for changes to college and universities policies regarding sexual violence.

          In honor of Sexual Assault ACTIVISM Month, SAFER will highlight 10 student sexual assault prevention activists around the nation who are creating change on their campus!

          #2. Members of Brandeis Students Against Sexual Violence, Brandeis University

          Students at Brandeis University, Waltham, Massachusetts, published a Change.org petition calling on their administrators to create a stronger, survivor-oriented sexual assault policy after a Tumblr entitled “SpeakOut! Brandeis” was published with the goal of promoting awareness of the prevalence of sexual assault and harassment on campus, and allow those affected by it to anonymously share their stories.

          SAFER provides student activists with a variety of resources, including the Activist Resource Center, which is our online library of sexual assault-related information and resources; on-campus Teach-Ins for student activists, which are led by skilled facilitators and equip students with the skills and information needed to bring about policy reforms and change; and, our Activist Mentoring Program (AMP!), which is our free mentoring service that provides students with continued support after they have completed an on-campus Teach-In.

            10 Student Sexual Assault Activists to Know!: #1 John Kelly, Tufts University

            Throughout the course of the last year, we at SAFER have proudly watched numerous student sexual assault prevention activists speak out against the prevalence of sexual assault on their campuses and call for changes to college and universities policies regarding sexual violence.

            In honor of Sexual Assault ACTIVISM Month, SAFER will highlight 10 student sexual assault prevention activists around the nation who are creating change on their campus!

            #1 John Kelly, Tufts University

            John Kelly, SA Prevention Activist, on the right at an ED ACT NOW Protest. 

            John Kelly is junior at Tufts University in Boston, Massachusetts, who, after experiencing first-hand the inadequacies of his institution’s sexual assault policy and disciplinary process became an activist with ED ACT NOW and Know Your IX and has advocated for Tufts to change their sexual assault policies and disciplinary procedures. As a male, queer survivor of sexual assault, John has worked to ensure sexual violence against men and members of the LGBTQ community are included in conversations and activism around campus sexual assault.

             

            SAFER provides student activists with a variety of resources, including the Activist Resource Center, which is our online library of sexual assault-related information and resources; on-campus Teach-Ins for student activists, which are led by skilled facilitators and equip students with the skills and information needed to bring about policy reforms and change; and, our Activist Mentoring Program (AMP!), which is our free mentoring service that provides students with continued support after they have completed an on-campus Teach-In.

              10 Things All Sexual Violence Prevention Activists Should Know: #10 Meeting People Where They Are

              10 Things All Sexual Violence Prevention Activists Should Know

              By Jessica Torres

              April is Sexual Assault ACTIVISM Month and in honor of all the hard work that has been done and will be done by college sexual assault prevention activists, SAFER has put together a “Top 10 Things All Sexual Violence Prevention Activists Should Know.” We will be posting one of the ten ideas/suggestions/concepts each day for the first ten days of #SAAM. Please check our blog and our social media for each day’s idea!

              Systems and traditions that allow and reinforce rape culture don’t exist in a vacuum; rape culture is informed by everyday microaggressions, historic disenfranchisement of specific groups (like women, LGBT folks, and people of color), and quite frankly, it’s a symptom of larger problems we often don’t have the language to discuss. Here are 10 things that all sexual violence prevention activists should know and consider as they further their efforts to build stronger and long-lasting policies that both reflect and challenge the needs and understanding of sexual assault for students on college campuses.

              #10 Meeting People Where They Are

               

              -avoid living in the Ivory Tower. Buzzwords aren’t everything, contextualize your work in a way that benefits everyone participating in the conversation.

              -folks are allowed to enter the movement regardless of how literate they are in the issues. Provide educational opportunities for folks who want to learn, invite them in and challenge people to think critically about where they stand.

                10 Things All Sexual Violence Prevention Activists Should Know: #9 Realizing there’s no “one-size-fits-all” solution

                10 Things All Sexual Violence Prevention Activists Should Know

                By Jessica Torres

                April is Sexual Assault ACTIVISM Month and in honor of all the hard work that has been done and will be done by college sexual assault prevention activists, SAFER has put together a “Top 10 Things All Sexual Violence Prevention Activists Should Know.” We will be posting one of the ten ideas/suggestions/concepts each day for the first ten days of #SAAM. Please check our blog and our social media for each day’s idea!

                Systems and traditions that allow and reinforce rape culture don’t exist in a vacuum; rape culture is informed by everyday microaggressions, historic disenfranchisement of specific groups (like women, LGBT folks, and people of color), and quite frankly, it’s a symptom of larger problems we often don’t have the language to discuss. Here are 10 things that all sexual violence prevention activists should know and consider as they further their efforts to build stronger and long-lasting policies that both reflect and challenge the needs and understanding of sexual assault for students on college campuses.

                9. Realizing there’s no “one-size-fits-all” solution

                -every institution has its own unique cultural issues that need to be addressed. So while it’s useful to compare notes, remember to tailor your demands to what your specific community needs.

                -be sure to push for a policy that grows with the needs of the community. If there isn’t a process to amend policy, push for that! And be sure to clearly highlight who to go to when it’s time to do so.

                  10 Things All Sexual Violence Prevention Activists Should Know: #8 Garnering outside community support

                  10 Things All Sexual Violence Prevention Activists Should Know

                  By Jessica Torres

                  April is Sexual Assault ACTIVISM Month and in honor of all the hard work that has been done and will be done by college sexual assault prevention activists, SAFER has put together a “Top 10 Things All Sexual Violence Prevention Activists Should Know.” We will be posting one of the ten ideas/suggestions/concepts each day for the first ten days of #SAAM. Please check our blog and our social media for each day’s idea!

                  Systems and traditions that allow and reinforce rape culture don’t exist in a vacuum; rape culture is informed by everyday microaggressions, historic disenfranchisement of specific groups (like women, LGBT folks, and people of color), and quite frankly, it’s a symptom of larger problems we often don’t have the language to discuss. Here are 10 things that all sexual violence prevention activists should know and consider as they further their efforts to build stronger and long-lasting policies that both reflect and challenge the needs and understanding of sexual assault for students on college campuses.

                  8. Garnering outside community support

                  -connect with local community members like small business owners, local activist groups, etc. Their understanding of the political landscape in the larger community is a critical asset for your movement’s sustainability

                  -if there are more colleges in your area, connect with them! Learn what kinds of strategies they’ve explored and exchange ideas. A great activist is always researching and building relationships with others.

                  -we’re talking about building safer communities for everyone, who isn’t into that?

                    10 Things All Sexual Violence Prevention Activists Should Know: #7 Building a sustainable movement that lasts beyond when vocal leaders graduate

                    10 Things All Sexual Violence Prevention Activists Should Know

                    By Jessica Torres

                    April is Sexual Assault ACTIVISM Month and in honor of all the hard work that has been done and will be done by college sexual assault prevention activists, SAFER has put together a “Top 10 Things All Sexual Violence Prevention Activists Should Know.” We will be posting one of the ten ideas/suggestions/concepts each day for the first ten days of #SAAM. Please check our blog and our social media for each day’s idea!

                    Systems and traditions that allow and reinforce rape culture don’t exist in a vacuum; rape culture is informed by everyday microaggressions, historic disenfranchisement of specific groups (like women, LGBT folks, and people of color), and quite frankly, it’s a symptom of larger problems we often don’t have the language to discuss. Here are 10 things that all sexual violence prevention activists should know and consider as they further their efforts to build stronger and long-lasting policies that both reflect and challenge the needs and understanding of sexual assault for students on college campuses.

                    7. Building a sustainable movement that lasts beyond when vocal leaders graduate

                    -make sure you reach out to newly matriculated students. Explain very clearly why they should care; sexual assault will impact all of us in immeasurable ways, oftentimes, without ever going away.

                    -build institutional memory, share your wealth of knowledge with anyone who may be interested in exchanging ideas in an easy, user-friendly, accessible space. That may be as simple as a curated Facebook page, a Tumblr, a blog, or even submitting articles to your school’s paper.

                    -document everything in some form of a database, this includes victories, big and small, as well as communications with key figures.

                    -diversify your leadership. Don’t just include the usual suspects as it will make the movement feel niche or unrelatable.

                    -learn your history! By placing your work in the context of your school’s activist history, you can take notes on what has or hasn’t worked before. And those who will come after you can do the same.